ASIA‑PACIFIC CENTER FOR SECURITY STUDIES

SUMMARY OF COMPLETED

CONFERENCES & OUTREACH EVENTS

(Publications are available on the web site, www.apcss.org)

 

2009

 

Pacific Rim Security – Managing the Global Commons.  Honolulu, Hawaii and Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, 10 - 14 January 2009.  This conference was co-hosted by Asia Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS), Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS), Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) at Stanford University, and Pacific Council on International Policy (PCIP).  Participants included 69 senior government and non-governmental civilian and military leaders, security practitioners, and security studies experts from the Pacific–Rim regions of Asia-Pacific and Latin America.  The conference provided a unique venue for senior government and non-governmental civilian and military leaders, security practitioners, and security studies experts from the Pacific–Rim region to gain insights on the confluence of transnational security concerns linking Asia and Americas, with focuses on the arenas of China and maritime domain, port security, energy security, environmental challenge, and U.S. maritime perspectives meant to enhance national security problem solving.  Particular targets included a mutual understanding of Pacific–Rim regional policies, the initiation of linkages with senior Pacific-Rim leaders and exploration of potential collaborative security strategies for managing the global commons.

 

Fellows’ Advocacy Workshop.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 4 - 6 March 2009. This workshop brought together key governmental civilian and military program facilitators, security practitioners, and key APCSS Alumni from select partner nations in the Asia-Pacific region with responsibilities for advocating “The Right Fellows” for APCSS courses and outreach activities.  The workshop was attended by 25 representatives; including members from the U.S. embassy, partner nation and alumni associations in the following countries:  Australia, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Maldives, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Tonga.   Four of the senior alumni reps from Australia, India, Philippines and Sri Lanka played a dual role; one as a participant in the workshop; and two, as a panel member discussing interagency cooperation with an ongoing resident course. The workshop focused on defining the Security Sector in its broadest sense, defining the characteristics and criteria for the “Right Fellow” and identifying and improving the process by which our tri-party national advocacy teams and APCSS identify, nominate and invite Fellows to APCSS courses. Through discussion and personal observations of an ongoing resident program, the teams gained a better understanding of APCSS’s executive education learning model, the current security sector and its practitioners; and are now prepared to improve their national process models for nominating Fellows to APCSS courses and outreach activities. 

 

Vietnam and United Nations Peace Operations Workshop.  Hanoi, Vietnam, 30 March – 3 April 2009. This conference was co-hosted by Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) and the Diplomatic Academy of Vietnam (DAV) at the Diplomatic Academy of Vietnam, in Hanoi, Vietnam.  The workshop provided a unique venue for mid-level civilian and military security practitioners from the Ministries of Foreign Affairs, Defense, Public Security and Health to gain valuable knowledge of United Nations peace operations, and engage in lively discussions on the future of Vietnam in these activities.  The workshop featured lectures in plenary provided by subject matter experts focused on topics that would be valuable to a country contemplating engaging in peace operations.  These were then followed by sub-group discussions where participants would deliberate on subjects presented and then develop possible courses of action in each of the topic discussions.  The workshop was attended by fifty-two participants, 44 Vietnamese; from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (6), Ministry of Defense (15), Ministry of Public Security (7), Ministry of Health (2), Diplomatic Academy (14), and Subject Matter Experts (8) from the Netherlands, Norway and United States.

 

 

 

 

 

South and Southeast Asia APCSS Alumni Associations Workshop – “Enhancing National Capabilities and Regional Cooperation”.  Manila, Philippines, 13 - 15 July 2009.  This workshop was co-hosted by APCSS Philippines Association (APA).  Participants included 14 national alumni association representatives from South and Southeast Asia including: Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand.  Laos sent a representative as an observer with the intention of establishing an alumni association at a later date.  Workshop attendees heard from a variety of senior Philippine government representatives during a series of guest speaker forums. In addition to the workshop attendees, nearly fifty APA participants joined for the Closing Event that featured an address by the U. S. Deputy Chief of Mission (DCM). The workshop focused on improving the connectivity between alumni and increasing the opportunity for collaboration and cooperation within and between associations.  The workshop enabled and empowered the alumni network through formal/informal associations by facilitated development of action plans designed to address how to connect, network, build self-sustaining capacity, and launch security cooperation initiatives within respective countries and regions. These action plans are recommendations only as they must be considered by each country’s alumni association prior to their approval and subsequent implementation.

 

Course on Security challenges Associated with Terrorism in Southeast Asia.  Phnom Penh, Cambodia,                10-14 August 2009.  Co-hosted with the Cambodian National Counter-Terrorism Committee – An interagency body headed by the Prime Minister, this event was a four and a half day, multi-national course addressing the principal security challenges associated with the evolving dynamic of terrorism in Southeast Asia.  Nations attending were Brunei, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, and the United States. This event was designed to complement APCSS’ existing CSRT resident course program, but was held in-region, and aimed at informing a higher, more attuned audience composed of  35 senior-level Counter Terrorism (CT) practitioners.  The course objectives consisted of forming a current understanding of the main dynamics and drivers of terrorism in Southeast Asia; exchanging descriptions and views of the best ways to improve CT efforts in Southeast Asia, both at the national and regional levels; discussing contemporary regional approaches to counter-terrorism and homeland security; facilitating small-group description of effective ways and means to lever and enhance existing CT efforts in Southeast Asia, particularly with respect to deterring, interdicting and managing extremist political violence that poses a direct challenge to effective regional governance; and exchanging participant views on critical next steps required to enact more effective CT systems that accurately reflect the evolving trajectory of terrorism in Southeast Asia.  Beyond these outcomes, the course was intended to help build working relationships that can be developed and enhanced through IT enabled linkages to lay the foundation for a close knit network of CT professionals.

 

Security Sector Development:  National Priorities and Regional Approaches. Honolulu, HI.  On October 4-9, 2009, the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) hosted its first multinational workshop “Security Sector Development: National Priorities and Regional Approaches” in Honolulu. The goal of the workshop was to promote a common and better understanding of a nation’s security sector, its evolution, development and reform potential, as well as related roles and responsibilities of security sector forces and institutions. Participating in the workshop were senior interagency cohort teams from Bangladesh, Indonesia, Maldives, Nepal, and Timor-Leste.  Invited to provide expert opinions to the participants, along with the Center’s own faculty, were senior members of the United Nation’s Office of the Rule of Law and Security Institutions, African Security Sector Network, Asia Foundation and Geneva Center for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces. The State Department and USPACOM were represented by observers. The five national teams developed and presented their recommended national action plans for security sector reform.  The workshop was attended by forty-three participants, 6 Bangladesh; 4 Indonesia; 4 Maldives; 4 Nepal; 5 Timor-Leste;          3 Observers; 4 Subject Matter Experts and 13 APCSS Faculty.

 

GCMC-APCSS Senior Alumni Seminar: Stability Operations and Reconstruction.  Garmisch, Germany,                 19-23 Oct 09.  Co-hosted with the George C. Marshall Center for Security Studies (GCMC) this Joint Senior Alumni Seminar was attended by APCSS alumni from 12 Asia-Pacific countries: Afghanistan, Canada, China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Thailand, and the United States.  Joining them were 18 GCMC alumni from throughout Europe.  The cross-regional seminar was designed to deepen the understanding of senior policy makers and practitioners of the multiple dimensions of stabilization and reconstruction missions; develop a common analytical framework; share practical experience and best practices in assisting fragile and failed states, as well as post-conflict reconstruction.  In addition, the seminar examined critical aspects of transferability: the transferability of practices and arrangements in assistance providers to recipients; and transferability of successful assistance practices from one case to another. The seminar also sought to identify fruitful areas for cross-regional cooperation.  

 

 

 

National Security and Civil-Military Relations in Bangladesh.  Dhaka, Bangladesh, 15-19 Nov 09.  This five-day workshop brought together 58 specially selected representatives from the current government of  Bangladesh (GoB), the Bangladesh Security Forces (BSF), and representatives of civil society.  The workshop presented an opportunity for participants to reflect and deliberate on (i) basic requirements for improving civil-security relations, in addition to professional development of security sector entities; (ii) what challenges and opportunities exist for each sector; (iii) greater appreciation of what responsibilities and levels of professionalism are attached to each security sector; (iv) what processes and next steps must be carried out to ensure that security sector development is initiated and security coordination generated.   The workshop consisted of a series of focused and facilitated discussions between the security institutions and civilian government.  Workshop discussions were guided to arrive at negotiated consensus on approaches and requisite action that fosters the attainment of Bangladeshi national interests.  The event was intended to create a forum for the national participants to grapple with difficult issues, and to this end APCSS role was intended to reflect strictly that of a facilitative group bringing key parties together. 

 

2008

 

Pandemic Tempest.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 10 January 2008.  This event was held at the request of Governor Linda Lingle, and the Secretary of Defense Strategic Policy Forum and in-coordination with United States Pacific Command.  This was the second pandemic influenza exercise conducted at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.  The exercise provided a forum for 73 Federal, state, and local officials to assess the range of policy options available to the U.S. in responding to an outbreak of pandemic influenza. 

 

Joint Mongolian/U.S. Emergency Preparedness and Risk Reduction Workshop.  Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia,                 10 - 14 March 2008.  This workshop was co-sponsored by the National Emergency Management Agency of Mongolia and the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, with the assistance of the Institute of Strategic Studies, the Pacific Disaster Center, and the United States Embassy, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.  Thirty-seven representatives from Mongolia and the United States participated in this workshop.  Participants represented various agencies from the Government of Mongolia, the Institute for Strategic Studies, the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies, the Pacific Disaster Center, and the National Emergency Management Agency.  The specific objectives of this workshop were to:  1)  review likely and possible disaster scenarios;  2) increase networking and relationships across governmental agencies;  3)  develop proposals for governance and doctrine improvements to enhance disaster management planning and risk reduction,       4)  identify measures to increase whole of government disaster resilience; and  5)  outline “next steps” and milestones for the development of a readiness and sustainment program at the interagency and operational level and to provide these next steps Mongolia’s executive leadership for emergency preparedness. 

 

Trilateral Radicalization Workshop.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 31 March – 3 April 2008.  APCSS served as a co-host to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.  The workshop focused on the linkage between “Radicalization” research, and policy formulation and evaluation.  The specific objectives of the workshop were to: share awareness of issues and terminology; identification of enhanced trilateral counter radicalization cooperation framework; enhance understanding of respective domestic and international counter-radicalization strategies, programs and activities; identification of short term, priority areas of concern; enhance inter-governmental cooperation; and greater sharing of specific research outcomes and reports.  Approximately 31 participants, who included currently serving Australian, Japanese and U.S. working level officials, including policy, legal, cultural, law enforcement, customs, and science and technology representatives, attended this workshop.

 

Strengthening Democratic Governance of the Security Sector: Indonesia and Mongolia. Honolulu, Hawaii and Washington, DC, 23 April – 1 May 2008.  The workshop was comprised of two sections, the first at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) in Honolulu, Hawaii, between 23 – 25 April 2008, and the second in Washington, D.C., from 28 April – 1 May 2008. In broad terms, this workshop shared perspectives about democratic governance over the security sector;  provided parliamentarians an opportunity to reflect on enhancing security sector governance in their respective countries; allowed parliamentarians an opportunity to gain insights into how security sector governance is exercised in the United States; and enabled parliamentarians an opportunity to interact and network with Members from key U.S. Committees/agencies, and engage in a dialogue on security sector governance in their respective countries.  Twenty-one attendees participated in this workshop.

 

Managing Borders in the Maritime Domain.  Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 9 - 11 June 2008.  Approximately 55 participants attended this event which was a follow-on multinational conference to the February 2007 land-border control conference held in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.  Our workshop co-host was the Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA).  The objectives of this conference were to: gain a current understanding on various Southeast Asia countries’ perspectives on border-control threats, challenges and opportunities in the maritime domain; exchange descriptions and views of the basic requirements for improving maritime border control; gain a better appreciation for shared maritime border control; facilitate small-group identification of ways and means of leveraging effective border control in the maritime domain to deter, interdict and lessen various forms of trafficking and other crimes detrimental to effective governance and population protection within the region; and exchange participant way-ahead views on next steps required to improve regional maritime border control systems that work well.

 

APCSS Alumni Associations Regional Security Cooperation Workshop.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 1 - 3 July 2008.  This workshop established parameters for the roles and activities of the model alumni association geared toward advancing security cooperation; expanding alumni network capacity; enhancing self sufficiency within associations; and increasing collaborative opportunities between associations.  In addition, the workshop established an accepted framework and guidelines for the extent of APCSS support to alumni associations; and standardized methods for reporting, tracking and assessing the results and impact of alumni association efforts.  The workshop was deemed necessary as the number of APCSS alumni associations has dramatically increased from four to 35 over the past two years and while some of these associations are engaging in innovative security-related activities, others lack the direction, guidance and support to advance their activities in the security cooperation realm.  Bringing key representatives of each alumni association together to discuss best practices and to define the framework within which associations and APCSS can better collaborate will help build alumni network and association capacity and stimulate the breadth and depth of alumni initiatives to advance Asia-Pacific security in support of OSD, PACOM and APCSS security cooperation goals and objectives.   A total of 61 participants including APCSS Alumni Association representatives, DoD and APCSS faculty and staff attended this workshop.

 

Information Sharing for Crisis Resiliency – Beyond Response and Recovery.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 8 - 11 July 2008.  This workshop was co-sponsored with the Pacific Disaster Center, and the Center of Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance.  Fifty-eight representatives from Australia, Bangladesh, Japan, Malaysia, Mongolia, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Republic of Korea, Thailand, the United States and Vietnam participated in this workshop. This workshop is designed to provide an opportunity for Asia-Pacific disaster management leaders from across the domains of civil government, military, non-governmental organizations, international organizations, and private sector to focus on information-sharing as a major tool to improve the prevention and mitigation dimensions of disaster management. The workshop addressed two aspects of information sharing: intra-governmental within host nations and multilateral across the entire spectrum of the international community.  The specific objectives of this workshop were to:  1) understand that information-sharing is an essential element of national resiliency and disaster mitigation, cross-sector trust, and confidence building; 2) propose categories of knowledge and information to be shared that would enable preventative actions, cross-sector trust, and improved confidence; 3) share current strategies and methodologies for intra-governmental and multilateral information sharing and existing information-sharing venues; 4) identify key indicators of disaster resiliency and their sources which support national/sub national risk analysis/vulnerability assessment, and which may be shared regionally; 5) analyze gaps in categories, strategies, methodologies, and data of information sharing to build resiliency and prevent disasters; and 6) recommend next steps to improve information-sharing in the Asia Pacific region for disaster prevention and risk reduction, with particular attention to integrating with the ARF/ASEAN disaster management process development.

 

Timor Leste – National Security Policy Development Workshop.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 8 - 12 September 2008.  This workshop brought together 21 selected parliamentarians and senior officials from Timor Leste plus 12 representatives from the United States relevant to the drafting of a National Security Strategy for the nation.  The workshop presented an opportunity for participants to reflect on (i) key current and anticipated security concerns confronting Timor Leste, (ii) the crafting of a National Security Strategy that effectively addresses these concerns, (iii) the next steps required towards the implementation of this Strategy, and (iv) the capacity gaps and assistance required to realize the goal of effective implementation. 

 

Pacific-Island Nation Security Collaboration.  Nakualofa, Tonga, 16 - 19 September 2008.  This workshop was co-hosted by Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) and the Tonga Defence Services (in co-operation with the United States Pacific Command and Pacific Islands Forum).  Thirty-five representatives from Tonga, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, Niue Islands, Nauru, Vanuatu, Tuvalu, Kiribati, Palau, Samoa, and the United States took part in this workshop.  The focus of the workshop was to build a better understanding of current and anticipated priority security concerns among South Pacific Island nations.  We achieved our desired outcomes: enhanced shared understanding of current and anticipated security issues in the South Pacific region; identified next steps required to enhance security collaboration; and created a network/community of security practitioners committed to security co-operation and with shared understanding of paths forward to achieve this.

 

Transnational Security Cooperation and Cross-Regional Cooperation. Honolulu, Hawaii, 26 - 31 October 2008.   This seminar was a joint effort of the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) and the Marshall Center.  The seminar brought together 26 senior alumni from both the Asia-Pacific and European areas.  The overall objective and theme of the seminar series was enhanced inter-regional understanding of security issues and concerns in regions supported by both Centers, as well as logical security-cooperation interfaces which required cross-regional collaboration.  The seminar identified proven practices in responding to security trends and shocks and expanded potential areas of inter-regional cooperation.

 

Lemhannas Leadership Development.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 17 - 18 November 2008.  This workshop was designed for this Indonesia Government security institution to provide them with U.S. best practices from various military orgs and academic institutions in Hawaii.   To this end, they visited separately with State of Hawaii’s government cabinet members and with PACOM JIACG staff members to discuss their roles/ responsibilities and the requirement for executive professional development and continued education.  In addition, they received a briefing from the University of Hawaii, Shidler Business School Executive Education Center on their roles and responsibilities in providing continuing education and relevant information to the senior executives and practitioners, and a briefing from Pacific Forum CSIS regarding its role and contributions to providing relevant analysis to executives and policy makers.  The Governor of Lemhannas, together with five other Lemhannas members plus four Center staff participated in this event.

 

 

2007

Working Group on Trilateral Confidence and Security Building Measures.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 10 - 11 January 2007.    This working group was co-sponsored by the Stanley Foundation. Twenty-one representatives from the China, Japan and the United States participated in the first meeting of this multi-phase project.  This meeting developed a tentative consensus on where to focus the efforts of the national teams in order to establish concrete and realistic confidence and security building measures that can be implemented to contribute to reducing the dangers of misunderstanding, miscalculation, and conflict, and to the misapprehension of military activities. The working group made progress toward developing a common language and understanding with which to discuss possible confidence and security building measures between our three countries, established a menu or list of both traditional and nontraditional confidence and security building measures for the national teams to explore, and produced a common timeline for future meetings and the submission of the proposals of each national team.

 

Managing Porous Borders In Southeast Asia:  Building International Cooperation, Good Governance and Intra-Government Cooperation.  Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 27 February – 2 March 2007. This conference was co-hosted by the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) and the Cambodian Institute for Cooperation and Peace (CICP).  Forty representatives from Australia, Burma, Cambodia, Laos, New Zealand, Thailand, the United States, Uruguay and Vietnam participated in this conference. This conference will examine how various levels of inter-agency officials in the governments of South East Asia nations coordinate and share useful information to delineate and control borders and correspondingly deal with all forms of trafficking challenges, including human, drug, weapons, and animals, as well as terrorist transits and disease control.  Break-out group discussions specifically address management techniques, procedures, technology and organizations related to efforts conducted by governments and non-governmental organizations in mainland South East Asia.

 

Energy Security Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific.  Tokyo Japan, 17 - 19 April 2007. Thirty representatives from Japan, Australia, Kazakhstan, Korea, Austria, China, and the United States met to develop a framework for characterizing dimensions of Asia-Pacific energy security, to identify areas for coordinate institutional and policy action, to re-examine existing, and formulate fresh regional approaches to energy management, and to articulate effective strategies for sustained cooperative action.

 

Democratic Control of the Security Forces Workshop.  Kathmandu, Nepal, 28 - 31 May 2007.  In conjunction with Center for Civil Military Relations (CCMR) and the Nepal-based South Asia Center for Policy Studies (SACEPS), APCSS conducted event within the frame of an IMET-funded series of events on “Democratic Transitions and Civil Military Relations”.  Participants included 6-10 Nepali officials from six major political parties of the Seven Party Alliance (SPA) in Nepal, as well as 3-5 representatives from smaller youth-based parties; 15-18 officials from the Nepal Army, Nepal Police, Armed Police Force and the government’s Defense and Home Ministries; 5-8 security analysts and academics from the Nepal-based Centre for Nepal and Asian Studies; and U. S. Ambassador J Moriarty and his Nepal country team.  These events were based on U. S. Ambassador Moriarty’s desire to support governance-strengthening events that would build on the results of an APCSS-Center for Nepal and Asian Studies (CNAS) co-sponsored workshop in September 2006.  Intent was to enhance the capacity of Government of Nepal (GON) institutions and leaders during their ongoing Democratic transition.  This Workshop provided a unique venue for further robust and candid discussions among various political and bureaucracy leaders, highlighting the sharing of current security-issue perspectives.

 

Disaster Management Workshop, Bandar Seri Begawan Brunei, 30 July - 2 August 2007.  The focus of seminar discussions was better understanding of how a high-level government coordination and advisory body manages disaster relief efforts conducted by the government of Brunei.  Included in such discussions are (1) disaster-relief management facility requirements; (2) procedures for timely and accurate situational understanding of the various dimensions of the disaster; (3) methods of coordinating and supervising internal government and non-government response efforts; and (4) managing the interface with involved external organizations

 

10th  Chiefs of Defense Conference: Charting a Course Toward Stability and Mutual Prosperity.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 30 October – 2 November 2007.  Hosted by the United States Pacific Command with coordination support from the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.  Sixty-nine participants, including 24 Chiefs of Defense from Australia, Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Canada, France, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga,  the United States, and Vietnam.  Two  and one – half days of sessions focused on current defense challenges and regional security concerns in the Asia-Pacific region.

 

Regional Counterparts Workshop.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 14 - 16 November 2007.  This workshop was designed as a collaborative, multi-national workshop of presiding officials from security studies institutes across the Asia-Pacific region to address shared major regional and global security issues.  The intent of the workshop was to identify collaboration interfaces related to educational and leader development concepts and means, research partnering, and faculty exchanges.  Specifically, the goals of the 29 participants were to identify opportunities in the areas of:  virtual participation and curriculum enhancement via Video Teleconferencing (VTC), partnering to co-host and/or facilitating/presenting on Outreach events in a conference, workshop or research project format, enlist regional Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) to participate in select APCSS events, explore adjunct-faculty opportunities, potential joint efforts in publications and research projects.

 

U.S. - Japan- China Tri-lat on Confidence and Security Building Measures (CSBM) #2.  Maui, Hawaii,                        4 - 6 December 2007.  This workshop, developed in coordination with the Stanley Foundation, was a follow-on, trilateral track 1-1/2 Working Group action which developed concrete and realistic Confidence and Security Building Measures that can be implemented to contribute to reducing the dangers of misunderstanding, miscalculation, and conflict, and to the misapprehension of military activities.   Workshop participants drafted a consensus-based paper with concrete CSBM recommendations for respective governments.  There were 21 participants representing China; Japan; the Stanley Foundation; Headquarters, U.S. Pacific Command; Headquarters, Pacific Air Forces; and the Asia-Pacific Center. 

 

United Nations Security Council: Role of Non-Permanent Member Seminar, Hanoi, Vietnam, 11 - 14 December 2007.  This seminar consisted of a series of focused and facilitated discussions involving specially selected representatives from the current government of Vietnam (GOVM).  All seminar discussions were private and not open to the misinterpretation of intent.  The focus of the seminar discussions was on the specific steps to prepare Vietnam as a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council.  The first day was spent with APCSS team and GOVM officials who were considered likely to be selected for service as the Vietnam representative to the UN Security Council, and reviewing the Charter of the UN.   Given this preface, the remainder of day one and day two was spent with same parties defining general objectives for the Vietnam contingent to the UN Security Council, as well as defining related, more specific, and measurable, performance standards related to each overall objective.  Day three was spent developing operational procedures for critical information exchange between the UN Security Council representative from Vietnam and GOVM authorities; and day four  included a series of discussions, some in lessons learned format, about best ways to develop proper working relationships with other Security Council members, as well as any “best” operating practices and procedures. 

 

 

 

2006

 

Countering the Support Environment for Terrorism in Southeast Asia.  Honolulu, Hawaii,                                          31 January – 2 February  2006.  Forty-two representatives from Australia, Indonesia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and the United States participated in this conference.  This conference drew participants from the United States as well as countries in the Asia-Pacific Region to focus on the spread of militant religious ideologies and the growth of transnational ‘enabling’ factors that allow illegal mobility and access to weapons and funding. The objectives of the conference were: to assess and understand the ideological underpinning of terrorism in the region (and its causes) and current trends; to assess the transnational ‘enabling’ factors, such as crime, porous borders, availability of small arms and explosives, that helps sustain terrorist organizations; and to assess current measures by states (and regional organizations) to counter terrorism and to identify any limitations that are acting as barriers to success.

 

 

Terrorism, Geopolitics and Multinational Security Cooperation in Central Asia.  Honolulu, Hawaii,                           22 - 24 February 2006.  Thirty-three representatives from China, India, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, Russia, Taiwan, United States and Uzbekistan participated in this conference.  This conference addressed the global war on terrorism, the momentous transformations in Central Asia, and the impact of these developments on Asia-Pacific security. Central Asia continues to struggle with the phenomena of religious extremism, poverty and corruption, political instability and authoritarian governance, great power suspicion and rivalry. Since Central Asia is an important seam, the presence and participation of senior representatives of both PACOM and CENTCOM provided a unique opportunity for a comprehensive analysis and more efficient application of DoD policy. The conference was conducted in partnership with the Marshall Center, strengthening the APCSS interdependence with that regional center.  The 3-day conference involved participants with an equal distribution between security practitioners and area experts. The conference format included panel discussions, breakout sessions as well as a teleconference with CENTCOM Command in Afghanistan.

 

Underlying Conditions of Terrorism.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 18 - 20 April 2006.  The APCSS, in coordination with the U.S. Army War College, conducted this conference for U.S. government officials.  It dealt specifically with the role and contributions of the U.S. Combatant Commands within the interagency effort toward countering the ideological support to terrorism.

 

Senior Inter-Agency Advisory Panel & Process (SIAPP) on National and Transnational Threats.  Jakarta Indonesia, 15 - 19 May 2006.  Partnered with Indonesian Department of Defence (DepHan), the APCSS-led team conducted a four and a half day seminar which began by introducing NSC-type approaches used in the U.S., Thailand, India and Mongolia.  A table top exercise examining how the GOI now handles high-level interagency coordination in a crisis situation, as well as how it might do so if it forms an NSC, was included.  Recommended terms of reference and related NSC establishment “next steps” were forwarded to the Indonesian Minister of Defence on the final seminar day by the GOI participants. 

 

Malaysia Outreach Counter-Terrorism Course.   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 22 - 26 May 2006.  Twenty-seven representatives from Cambodia, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and the United States participated in this course.  This was a 5-day multinational course partnered with the Southeast Asia Regional Center for Counter Terrorism aimed at better understanding extremist ideology and the related use of the internet to promote an extremist agenda, recruit, and train extremist practitioners to commit acts of violence and thereafter advertise the success of such acts.  The objectives of this course were:  assess current trends in terrorism in SE Asia, particularly as they relate to information or communication technology; understand how terrorist ideologies (including tactical information, such as that related to suicide terrorism) are transmitted via the Internet or other types of communication technology; understand the linkage between information technology and critical infrastructure protection;  understand the importance of networks in the context of terrorism and the information revolution; and understand how the information revolution (and new communication technologies) can facilitate interagency cooperation.

 

2006 Strategic Communications and the Regional Centers.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 14 - 16 August 2006.  A follow-up to our November 2005 conference, our objectives were to share the latest developments on Strategic Communications in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Department of State and in the regions.  We also focused on information sharing between agencies and organizations.

 

Technology Cooperation & Asia-Pacific Maritime Security.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 22 - 24 August 2006.  Forty-one representatives from Australia, Cambodia, Canada, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Thailand and the United States participated in this conference.  This conference evaluated and assessed existing intra-regional maritime security issues; analyzed current maritime institutional and technological capabilities in the region; identified issues to provide opportunities for U.S. engagement in addressing existing and potential regional maritime threats; and generated cooperative approaches and initiatives for enhancing intra-regional technological cooperation and exchange to improve the maritime security environment.

 

Democratic Transition and Security Reform in Nepal Workshop - Kathmandu, Nepal, 28 August – 1 September 2006.  Forty senior Nepali security force and government representatives participated in this five-day workshop.  This workshop, in collaboration with the Centre for Nepal and Asian Studies, facilitated dialogue among policy makers, political leaders, security practitioners and civil society representatives of Nepal on priority steps in improving the very challenging security and governance environment in Nepal.  The workshop attendees produced an outline for the security sector reform which was briefed to senior Nepali government officials.

 

Security Cooperation and Governance in SEA:  Responding to Terrorism, Insurgency and Separatist Violence in Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines.  Singapore, 26 - 28 September 2006.  Seventy-two representatives from Indonesia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and the United States participated in this three-day multilateral conference.  This conference, in collaboration with the Institute of Defence and Strategic Studies, addressed the  effectiveness of responses to terrorism, insurgency and separatist violence in Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines. 

 

9th  Chiefs of Defense Conference: Meeting Security Challenges with Capabilities and Cooperation.  Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 13 – 15 November 2006.  Co-hosted by the United States Pacific Command and Malaysia Armed Forces with coordination support from the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.  Fifty-two participants, including 23 Chiefs of Defense from Australia, Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Comoros, France, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Mongolia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga,  the United States, and Vietnam.  One and one – half days of sessions focused on current defense challenges and cooperative approaches to meeting these challenges in the Asia-Pacific region. 

 

Exercise Global Tempest.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 9 December 2006.  Sixty-eight attendees from the federal executive and state level participated in this one day conference. This conference examined the strategic implications of a global influenza pandemic and analyzed the range of U.S. preparedness, detection, response, and containment options available throughout the pandemic alert and pandemic period.

 

 

2005

 

Inter-Korean Reconciliation and Cooperation:  Challenges and Prospects.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 1-3 March 2005.  Forty-four representatives from China, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russia, and the United States participated in this conference.  The goal for this conference was to address all aspects of the process of inter-Korean reconciliation.  It examined the instabilities and opportunities generated in the DPRK and ROK, the impact of Korean reconciliation on the growing concerns of the external powers, including the WMD proliferation, potential threat of military conflict, and terrorist threats on the Korean peninsula, as well as its long-term consequences for the geopolitical configuration and security architecture in Northeast Asia.

 

Enhancing Cooperation in Disaster Relief:  The Asian Tsunami as a Case Study.  Honolulu, Hawaii,                        15 - 17 March 2005.  Forty-eight U.S. representatives participated in this conference. Our objective for this conference was to examine the initial phases of the tsunami response at the strategic, policy, and operational levels, and suggest areas where change would foster a better effort in future humanitarian assistance and disaster relief efforts.

 

U.S.-Russia Perspectives on Asia-Pacific Security.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 2 – 4 May 2005.  Twenty-nine representatives from Russia and the United States participated in this joint conference with Far Eastern National University and APCSS.  Our objective for this conference was to address the evolving security situation in the Asia-Pacific from the U.S. and Russian perspectives, identify areas of mutual concern and possible new avenues for bilateral and regional cooperation.

 

2005 Pacific Symposium:  Asia Pacific Democracies:  Advancing Prosperity and Security.  Honolulu, Hawaii,          8 - 10 June 2005.  This conference was co-sponsored by the National Defense University, United States Pacific Command and APCSS.  This three day conference provided a forum for practitioners and scholars from the United States and the Asia-Pacific region to examine political transitions in Asia, their consequences for the region, and the implications for U.S. foreign and security policies.  Two hundred forty-five delegates from forty-three countries participated in this conference.

 

The Impact of the War on Terrorism on Island State Security:  Navigating Instabilities.  Honolulu, Hawaii,               19 – 21 July 2005.  This conference was co-hosted by the East-West Center and APCSS.  Twenty-four representatives from American Samoa, Australia, Marshall Islands, New Zealand, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa and the United States participated in this conference. Our objective for this conference was to assess the threat to Oceania and explore opportunities for regional and international cooperation.  This conference examined issues such as the relevance of terrorism to Pacific Island security agendas, the potential vulnerabilities of the islands to transnational threats displaced from South-East Asia, lessons learned from past interventions, and the role of regional institutions in security making.

 

Biosecurity Threats in the Asia-Pacific Region.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 8 – 11 August 2005.  Forty-nine delegates from China, Indonesia, Singapore, Switzerland, Thailand, Vietnam and the United States participated in this conference.  This conference co-hosted with the Center of Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance examined policies and strategies to combat or mitigate the severity of existing, emergent, and potential infectious diseases.  The objectives of this conference were to articulate U.S. and international interagency policy planning and coordination challenges as they relate to reacting to biosecurity threats; to discuss new and emerging diseases that are likely to affect the Asia-Pacific region stability and health; to examine currently available training and education in surveillance and response planning; and raw requirements for national and international preparedness and response; and devekio ideas to improve current biosecurity threat response practices through multilateral dialogue.

 

Perspectives on Asia-Pacific Security for the 21st Century.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 12 – 13 September 2005.  This conference provided a forum for examining security issues and its implications for theater security cooperation in the region.  The goal of the conference was to foster security cooperation and multilateral dialogue among officials and experts from throughout the Asia-Pacific region, at the governmental as well as non-governmental level.  Because the United States shares a common interest in maintaining security cooperation with its allies and other partners, the conference sought to elicit fresh perspectives on Asia-Pacific security through exchange of diverse views and ideas from throughout the region. Sixty-seven delegates from twenty-eight countries participated in this conference.   

 

Japan’s Foreign and Security Policies:  Alternatives, Drivers and Implications.  Tokyo, Japan, 4 – 6 October 2005.  Forty-two delegates from Australia, China, Japan, Republic of Korea, Singapore, United Kingdom and the United States.  Japan and the U.S.-Japan alliance are the linchpins of American security policy in the Asia-Pacific region.  Japan’s foreign and security policies are the therefore of critical importance to long-term regional stability and U.S. interest in the region.  This conference sought to achieve three core objectives:  1)  To assess the ongoing debate within Japan about foreign and security policy alternatives available to the country, with a view to determining what direction will most likely be taken by Japan, 2)  To assess the various factors that shape the decisions and directions taken by Japan regarding its foreign and security policies in an effort to ascribe relative importance to factors, 3)  To assess the implications of these possible alternative directions and factors on the U.S.-Japan alliance and key Asian security issues.

 

8th Chiefs of Defense Conference:  Shaping Collective Efforts to Counter Transnational Threats.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 24 – 26 October 2005.  Hosted by the United States Pacific Command with coordination support from the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.  Fifty-seven participants, including 23 Chiefs of Defense from Australia, Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Canada, Comoros, Fiji, France, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mongolia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, and the United States.  One and one – half days of sessions focused on current defense concerns and challenges that will have overlapping effects on the militaries and nations in the Asia-Pacific region. 

 

Strategic Communication and the Regional Centers.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 1 – 3 November 2005.  Thirty participants from Germany and the United States.  This conference was designed to share concepts and “best practices” among the Regional Security Studies Centers on how they can and do support national and regional Combatant Commanders’ Strategic Communication program and to develop a set of “Next Steps” aimed at moving discussion of synergizing Strategic Communication efforts of the various regional centers within a regional multinational context.

 

Northeast Asia and Mongolia:  Opportunities and Challenges.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 8 – 10 November 2005.  Forty representatives from Mongolia, China, Japan, South Korea, Russia, Canada and the United States participated in this conference.  The conference was co-sponsored by the School of Hawaiian, Asian and Pacific Studies of the University of Hawaii and the East West Center.  The Mongolian Academy of Management was another major contributor.  The collective effort of Honolulu based think tanks and educational institutions was unprecedented and very rewarding in terms of covering a wider than usual scope of security issues and providing a stronger interdisciplinary approach.  Among the key objectives for the conference was to assess the role of Mongolia in regional processes in Northeast Asia, such as economic integration, development of common infrastructure, use of energy resources, protection of environment as well as cooperation in fighting transnational crimes.  Since Northeast Asia is one of the priority areas of Mongolia’s foreign policy, the conference was designed to assess the current state and future prospects of Mongolia’s relations with her immediate neighbors in order to understand their likely impact on U.S.–Mongolia partnership and key Asian security issues. One of the major outcomes of the conference was the identification of new opportunities for promoting multinational cooperation in Northeast Asia- a region that has been lacking in mutual confidence, security interaction, and regional institution building.

 

2004

 

Enhancing Security, Cooperation and Peace on the Korean Peninsula.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 27 – 29 January 2004.  Thirty-two representatives from Australia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russia, Taiwan and the United States participated in this conference.  At the time of looming North Korean military threat amidst escalating nuclear crisis on the Korean Peninsula, the challenge for the U.S.-ROK alliance is to reform while remaining strong.  As Seoul contemplates a more self-reliant approach to national security and Washington realigns its global military posture, the conference discussed the impacts these changes will have on regional security, multilateral cooperation and peace in Korea and Northeast Asia.

 

Asian Regional Security and Economic Development.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 4 – 7 February 2004.  This conference was part of a continuing project conducted by the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) of Stanford University. Fourteen representatives from China, India, Russia and the United States met to explore avenues for multilateral cooperation amongst the countries attending.  Topics focused on security issues such as nonproliferation policies and terrorism, the international dimension of combating bioterrorism, regional cooperation and the control of WMD, and radiological terrorism. 

 

7th Annual US-Japan Security Relations.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 17 February 2004.  Twenty representatives from Japan and the United States participated in this conference co-hosted with the Defense Research Center of Tokyo Japan.  The purpose of this conference was to explore issues related to Japan’s security policies, the evolving situation on the Korean Peninsula, and U.S.–Japan bi-lateral security relations.

 

Defense Transformation in the Asia-Pacific Region:  Meeting the Challenge.  Honolulu, Hawaii,                                30 March – 1 April 2004.  Thirty-three representatives from Australia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Singapore, United Kingdom and the United States participated in this conference.  The conference consisted of three sections:  The basic meaning and demands of defense transformation; special issues in defense transformation facing the Asia-Pacific region as a whole; and how individual nations in the Asia-Pacific region are dealing with the challenges of defense transformation. 

 

Fourth Biennial Conference of the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies:  Security Trends in the Asia Pacific Region.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 15 – 17 June 2004.  Two hundred nineteen representatives from 36 countries participated in the conference.  Attendees were from Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, Canada, China (to include Taiwan), Comoros, Fiji, France, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Laos, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Micronesia, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Russia, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tuvalu, Vietnam and the United States.  The goal of this conference was to identify developments in national, regional, and human security that will shape the security environment of the Asia-Pacific in the near future and to facilitate the exchange of views on national, regional and human security issues between analysts from throughout the Asia-Pacific region, broadening the outlook of participants. Approaches and strategies for averting emerging and continuing threats to security faced by Asia-Pacific countries were also addressed.

 

U.S.-China Security Relations.  Shanghai China, 5 – 7 August 2004.  This conference, co-sponsored with Pacific Forum CSIS and Fudan University in Shanghai China, brought together 30 policy analysts for an exchange of views and positions on security issues of common concern.  The goal was to assess the current state of bilateral relations, gain data essential to understanding intentions, and identify areas of agreement and disagreement.  Discussions focused on how national interests are defined, how they might evolve during the next 5-10 years, and how these patterns may impact foreign and security policies.

 

U.S. Worldwide POW/MIA Accounting Efforts:  Process and Operations.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 9 – 12 August 2004.  Twenty-eight (28) representatives from six countries participated in the conference.  Attendees were from Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Russia, United States, and Vietnam.   This conference was co-sponsored by The Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) and the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in cooperation with Pacific Command’s Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC).  The conference drew participants from countries in the Asia-Pacific region in which the U.S. conducts personnel accounting operations and served to increase understanding of the Prisoner of War/Missing in Action (POW/MIA) and personnel accounting issues, review the processes involved in personnel accounting, and develop ideas to improve current practices through multilateral discussion.

 

7th  Chiefs of Defense Conference: Cooperative Approaches to Meeting Security Challenges.  Tokyo, Japan,         11 – 14 November 2004.  Co-hosted by the United States Pacific Command and Japan Defense Agency with coordination support from the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.  Fifty-seven participants, including 26 Chiefs of Defense from Australia, Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Comoros, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, the United States, and Vietnam.  One and one – half days of sessions focused on current defense challenges and cooperative approaches to meeting these challenges in the Asia-Pacific region. 

 

Ethnic Minorities and Great Power Strategies in Asia Conference.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 12 – 14 October 2004.  The conference brought together senior diplomats, intelligence analysts, journalists, NGO representatives, and leading academics. In addition to the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies and United States Pacific Command representatives, twenty-six (26) individuals representing twelve (12) nations (Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Philippines, Germany, United States, Russia, India, Canada, United Kingdom, Thailand, Israel, China) participated in this conference.  The conference aimed at advancing United States policymakers’ understanding of Great Power ethno-strategies in the Asia-Pacific region, and thus to improve the policymakers’ capacity to fashion security policies appropriate not only to the conduct of bilateral relations with China, Russia, and India, but also to the promotion of broader United States strategic interests in the Asia- Pacific, including the global war on terrorism.

 

ROK-Japan –U.S. Military Officers Conference.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 27 – 28 October 2004.  Co-hosted by the United States Pacific Command J5, thirty attendees from the three nations met for two full days and exchanged views on a wide range of security concerns was well as discussed specific areas for trilateral security cooperation.

 

Asia-Pacific Homeland Security Summit and Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii, 15 – 17 November 2004.  Co-hosted by the State of Hawaii and USPACOM, over 800 attendees from over 40 nations met participated in this conference.  Last year’s inaugural event was the region’s premier homeland security conference.  The 2004 summit built on several of last year’s topics, including a review of significant changes in regional security over the past twelve months.  This year’s summit included four focused sessions with 150 attendees, referred to collectively as “Track 4”, organized by the Asia Pacific Center for Security Studies as executive agent for USPACOM, that brought together organizations dealing primarily with education and research in the field of combating terrorism.  Track 4 participants laid the foundation for a “Combating Terrorism Regional Outreach” program, a network of Asia Pacific security professionals cooperating on education and information activities relating to combating terrorism.  This outreach program would foster multinational and interagency information sharing and provide a virtual information resource center for strategic-level counter terrorist practitioners in the Global War on Terrorism. This virtual center would provide open-source and unclassified information available to strategic and security studies institutions as well as strategic and operational level headquarters.  Through collaboration, these various agencies can develop education programs for security professionals at the appropriate levels.

 

U.S. Defense Transformation:  Implications For Security in the Asia-Pacific Region.  Honolulu, Hawaii,                     1 – 3 December 2004.  Thirty-four delegates representing ten nations (Australia, India, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russia, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, United Kingdom and the United States) as well as the NATO alliance participated in this conference.  The conference consisted of three sections:  current US efforts to transform its forces and how Washington perceives this as affecting security and stability in the Asia-Pacific region; how Asia-Pacific nations – allies, friendly non-allies, and great-power states – perceive and respond to US transformation; and special issues in defense transformation that the United States might consider in helping promote transformation as a peace- and confidence-building measure. 

 

 

2003

 

Central Asia, Global Terrorism and Asia-Pacific Security.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 12 – 14 February 2003.  Thirty-nine  representatives from Afghanistan, China, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Pakistan, Russia, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and the United States participated in this conference.  The primary objectives of the conference were to identify the major issues and trends in Central Asia’s involvement in the global campaign against terrorism, the internal and external reasons for the emergence of Islamic militancy in the region and its continuing existence, the impact of the U.S. military presence in Afghanistan and Central Asia on the evolution of U.S.-Russian and U.S.-Chinese relations, the likely future configuration of regional forces, the opportunities for advancing peace and stability in Central Asia and enhancing its economic potential as well as incorporating Central Asia in a broader process of confidence-building and cooperative relationships that are unfolding both in Europe and Asia.

 

2003 Pacific Symposium, “Toward a Durable Regional Security Strategy,” Honolulu, Hawaii, 25 – 27 March 2003.  Co-hosted by NDU INSS and USPACOM, two-hundred twenty (220) representatives from Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Bhutan, Canada, Chile, China, Comoros, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Laos, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Micronesia, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of South Korea, Russia, Sri Lanka, Taiwan (China), Thailand, Timor – Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, United Kingdom, United States, Vanuatu, and  Vietnam attended the conference.  Specific objectives were to provide the Commander, U.S. Pacific Command with an international forum to present and discuss the recently released national security strategy and to solicit from regional representatives ideas on how to operationalize the national security strategy in a manner more likely to win the support of friends and allies. 

 

2002 Presidential Elections in the Republic of Korea:  Implications and Impacts.  Honolulu, Hawaii,                         15 – 17 April 2003.  Forty-three representatives from Republic of Korea, Japan, Russia, Canada and the United States participated in this conference. The primary objective of this conference was to examine the December 2002 presidential elections in the Republic of Korea in terms of its implications and potential consequences for domestic, inter-Korean and regional policy issues.  This conference examined several topics pertaining to the 2002 presidential elections to include:  historical and comparative perspectives of the 2002 presidential elections; review of the 2002 presidential elections; implications of the elections for South Korean domestic politics; impact of the election on the U.S. - Republic of Korea security alliance; and impact of the elections on inter-Korean relation.  Many of these topics were reflected in a video teleconference with Lieutenant General Lance Smith, Deputy Commander, United States Forces Korea, and during seven panel sessions and one keynote address.

 

U.S.-China Relations and Regional Security.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 27 – 29 April 2003.  Twenty-five representatives from the United States and China participated in this conference, co-hosted with Pacific Forum CSIS.  This was the fourth in a series that brought together specialists from the U.S. and China to look closely at key issues in political, economic, and security relations.  Sessions included a look at the anti-terrorism campaign and its implications for U.S.-China relations, developments on the Korean Peninsula, and cross-strait relations.  Concluding sessions focused on key future issues in the relationship and avenues for cooperation and coordination.

 

Leadership and Political Change in China.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 28 – 30 May 2003.  Forty-four representatives from the United States, China, Australia, India, Finland, Singapore and the United Kingdom participated in this conference.  The primary objective of this conference was to advance understanding of the 16th Communist Party of China (CPC) National Congress in October 2002 and the 10th National People’s Congress (NPC) in March 2003, in the context of domestic and global politics.

 

Islam and Democracy - Collision or Co-Existence?  Honolulu, Hawaii, 16 June 2003.  One hundred and five representatives from 38 countries participated in this conference.  The primary objective of this conference was to explore the relationship between Islam and democracy and how this relationship forms the centerpiece of political debate in a number of Muslim societies.  Included in the discussion was the causes and conditions for the emergence of Islamist elements, such as growing religious piety, political manipulation of religion, fear of westernization/globalization, and dissatisfaction with home governments as well as what these debates mean for international security.

 

Island State Security 2003:  “Oceania at the Crossroads.”  Honolulu, Hawaii, 15 – 17 July 2003.  One hundred and forty representatives from 34 countries participated in this conference.  Key speakers were from American Samoa, Australia, Canada, Fiji, Guam, Kwajalein, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and the United States.  This conference was a follow-up on the 2001 conference.  The primary objects were to discuss the security agenda for the Oceania sub-region in the post 9/11 world; the value of considering the region as an “arc of instability” or as becoming “Africanized,” as well as the prospects and obstacles for nation-building in some of the island states; evaluate the security policies of regional powers and other nations, especially the United States, in the Oceania sub-region; role of the Compact of Free Association and the role of Kwajalein Atoll in U.S. security; and discuss the topics of transnational crime, health and humanitarian assistance, and social development projects in Oceania.  Extended question and answer sessions discussed customs and small arms, criminal intelligence and medical threats, and social developments.

 

India and the Emerging Geopolitics of the Indian Ocean Region.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 19 – 21 August 2003.  Forty-four attendees from Australia, India, Canada, Germany, China, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Pakistan, the United Kingdom, Malaysia, and the United States participated in this conference.  The conference explored India’s role and impact in the region and the strategic significance of the Indian Ocean nations in contemporary world politics.  It also examined the specific security concerns of the Indian Ocean states. 

 

6th Chiefs of Defense Conference:  Security Transformation in the Asia-Pacific Region.  Honolulu, Hawaii,               5 – 7 November 2003.  Hosted by the United States Pacific Command with coordination support from the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.  Sixty participants, including 23 Chiefs of Defense from Australia, Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Fiji, France, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, and the United States.  One and one – half days of sessions focused on current defense concerns and challenges that will have overlapping effects on the militaries and nations in the Asia-Pacific region. 

 

Pipelines and Fault Lines:  The Geopolitics of Energy Security in Asia.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 21 – 23 October 2003.  Twenty-eight attendees from China, India, Israel, Norway, Russia, United Kingdom and the United States participated in this conference.  The conference built on the massive and sustained international attention to gas and oil pipeline politics & diplomacy of recent years.  The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have, of course, stimulated even greater global attention on energy issues, including the various competing pipeline projects for extracting the huge oil and natural gas resources of the so-called “trans-Asiatic energy corridor.”  The “pipeline politics and diplomacy” of the Central Asian region has its parallels in the other major sub-regions of Asia – Northeast, Southeast, Southwest, & South Asia.  There is enormous scope for both energy competition and cooperation in Asia.  The future of security cooperation in general in the Asia-Pacific region will be heavily influenced by the degree of energy cooperation (or conflict) that is achieved.

 

Challenges of International Cooperation in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies.  Honolulu, Hawaii,                          4 – 6 November 2003.  One hundred and forty-three representatives from 34 countries participated in this conference.  Key speakers were from Canada, Indonesia, Mongolia, Philippines, Australia, United Kingdom and the United States.  This conference focused on the challenges confronting international organizations, NGOs, the military, and civilian police in general, and how coordination among these groups may be improved.  Topics addressed included:  How the changing nature of conflict and peace operations has effected the complexity and multidimensional nature of complex humanitarian emergencies; and, how political policy at UN and governmental level to deal with these emergencies is developed, the specific challenges and roles of organizations responding to these crises; and lastly, what structures have been developed to encourage cooperation, and lessons learned from previous peace support missions that may support cooperation in the future.

 

Russia and Russian Far East:  Transnational Security and Regional Cooperation, Honolulu, Hawaii,                          2 – 4 December  2003.  Thirty-two representatives from China, Japan, Russia, South Korea, Taiwan and the United States participated in this conference.  The purpose of this conference was to bring together senior policy makers, defense officials, and academics from the Asia – Pacific region to discuss regional security issues.  Specific objectives were to assist the understanding of comprehensive security in the Russian Far East and the Asia-Pacific region, the challenges of transnational threats, and the incorporation of the Russian Far East into the wider Asia-Pacific regional perspective.  The goal of the conference was to provide timely information on Russian Far East security problems and approaches usable by security practitioners and policymakers.  

 

 

2002

 

Ramifications of Taiwan’s December 2001 Elections for U.S.-PRC Relations. Honolulu, Hawaii, 4 – 5 February 2002.  Forty-five participants participated from China, Taiwan, and the United States.  The purpose of the conference was to evaluate the latest trends in Taiwan domestic politics based on the outcome of the December 2001 elections.  Goals of the conference were to assess the implications of these trends for peace in the Taiwan Strait, identify new possible dangers to, and opportunities for, U.S. interests in the region, and facilitate discussion of an important security issue between U.S. and Chinese scholars of Asian security.

 

Transnational Violence and Seams of Lawlessness in the Asia-Pacific.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 19 – 21 February 2002.  Thirty-one participants participated from Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States.  The conference sought to identify linkages and convergence patterns between transnational phenomena (drug trade, money laundering, human smuggling) and terrorism.

 

Growth and Governance in Asia.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 12 – 14 March 2002.  One hundred twenty-four participants representing 34 nations within the Asia-Pacific Region participated in this conference.  Representatives from Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, China, the Cook Islands, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, the Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Micronesia, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Niue Island, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, the Republic of Korea, Russia, Samoa, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, the United Kingdom, the United States, Vanuatu and Vietnam discussed the problems of economic governance ands statehood in Asia at a time of rapid economic globalization.  Specific objectives were to examine the challenges in governance in Asia, economic growth and its management, globalization and social governance in Asia and growth of civil society and democratization.

 

China’s Leadership Transition.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 9 April 2002.  Twenty on-island participants represented the views of China and the United States at this conference.  Discussions on the changes evident in the Ninth National People’s Congress in March 2002 and what clues there are for future developments was the main objective of the conference.

 

Future Relations – United States, Republic of Korea and Japan.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 17-19 April 2002.  Co-sponsored with Pacific Forum CSIS, this conference included sixty-one participants from Japan, the Republic of Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States.  Specific objectives were to discuss the fundamental values and interests that under gird relations among the US, ROK and Japan, to assess the existing security environment and relations among and between the three countries, and to consider the various factors – social, economic and political – that shape bilateral relations and the trilateral relationship.

 

Nationalism in Northeast Asia.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 30 April – 2 May 2002.  Forty-one participants from Australia, China (to include Taiwan), Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation and the United States participated in this conference.  The purpose of the conference was to define “Nationalism” in the Asian political context and evaluate the way nationalism is developed and used to attain political goals.

 

Dynamics of China’s Relations with South and Southeast Asia.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 26 – 27 June 2002.  Twenty-five participants from China (to include Taiwan), Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia, India, Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines, and the United States participated in this conference.  The purpose of the conference was to better understand China’s dealings with and influence in Asia; identify and discuss areas of convergence and divergence in relations between China and other Asian states; and to discover patterns and trends that may affect regional economic, political and military relationships in the near future.

 

Biennial Conference of the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies: Enhancing Regional Security Cooperation.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 16 – 18 July 2002.  Two hundred participants from 35 countries participated.  Attendees were from Australia, Bangladesh, China (to include Taiwan), Cook Islands, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mongolia, Nepal, Niue Island, New Zealand, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Russia, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, Tuvalu, United Kingdom, United States, Vanuatu, and Vietnam.  The purpose of the conference was to assess Asian perspectives on U.S. efforts / policies to enhance regional security cooperation; assess Asian perspectives on cooperating on peacekeeping and Humanitarian Assistance Disaster Relief operations; identify realistic next steps towards developing “Habits of Cooperation;” and, assess the impact of the “War on Terrorism” on cooperation on other transnational issues.

 

Religion and Security in South Asia.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 19 – 22 August 2002.  Forty participants attended from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Thailand, Denmark, Netherlands, Canada, and the United States.  The purpose of this conference was to examine emerging policy implications of religious radicalism in the politics and interstate relations of the major state actors of the South Asian region – India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.  The focus was on the potential effects of religious radicalism on a number of key aspects of security in the region.

 

IT Revolution and National Security On Korean Peninsula.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 8 – 10 October 2002.  Forty participants attended from Canada, Japan, New Zealand, Republic of Korea, Russia, and the United States.  This conference was designed to open dialogue and increase transparency by bringing together Information Technology (IT) experts from the military and civilian sectors in Korea and its neighboring countries in order to examine the current status, scope, and consequences of the IT revolution for security relations on the Korean peninsula and Northeast Asia. 

 

 

6th Annual US-Japan Security Relations.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 16 October 2002.  Twenty-two representatives from Japan and the United States participated in this conference.  The purpose of this conference was to examine key issues as they evolve in the US – Japan security relationship. 

 

5th Chiefs of Defence Conference:  Meeting Security Challenges in the 21st Century.  Singapore,                                1 – 3 November  2002.  Co-Hosted by the United States Pacific Command and the Singapore Armed Forces with coordination support from the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.  Sixty-five participants, including 21 Chiefs of Defense from Australia, Brunei, Canada, France, India, Japan, Korea, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, and the United States.  One and one – half days of sessions focused on current defense concerns and challenges within the respective Asia – Pacific countries.

 

The Asia-Pacific: A Region Of Transitions.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 5 – 7 November 2002.  One-hundred forty-two representatives from Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Canada, Chile, China, Cook Islands, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Micronesia, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Niue Island, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Russia, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, Tuvalu, United States, and Vietnam participated in this conference.  The purpose of this conference was to identify the forms and courses of transitions within the region and analyze the relative weight of political, economic, cultural, and ethnic factors.  In addition, it analyzed the impact of various forms of transition on the regional security environment and identified approaches to dealing with the problems of transition.

 

Environment and Security in the Asia-Pacific Region.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 19 – 21 November 2002.  Thirty-eight representatives from Canada, India, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines, Republic of Korea, and the United States attended this conference.  The purpose of this conference was to advance policymakers’ understanding of the relationship between various environmental factors and security in the Asia – Pacific region as well as how an environmental dimension can be incorporated into select mission areas in order to improve USPACOM’s capacity to assess and fashion policies appropriate to upcoming environmental – security challenges in the region.

 

Asian Regional Security and Economic Development.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 2 – 5 December 2002.  Twenty-eight representatives from China, India, Pakistan, Russia, and the United States participated in this conference.  Co-Hosted by the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies and Stanford University’s Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC), this conference continued the process begun in 2001 of exploring avenues for multilateral cooperation on key issues of regional security in South and Central Asia, among the United States, China, India, Pakistan and Russia; specific discussions centered around stability in South Asia and the control of weapons of mass destruction, and policy options for regional security.

 

 

2001

 

Domestic Determinants of Security:  Security Institutions and Policy-Making Processes in the Asia-Pacific Region.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 10 – 11 January 2001.  Thirty participants participated from China, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, United Kingdom, United States, and representatives of Fiji and Taiwan.  The purpose of the conference was to enhance mutual understanding of how domestic issues drive the formation of security in terms of both institutions and the policy-making process in ten key countries in the Asia-Pacific region.  The goal was to identify areas of common concern that can lead to a better understanding of each other’s countries.

 

Prospects of Indonesian Security.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 27 – 28 February 2001.  Nineteen participants participated from Australia, Indonesia, and the United States.  The purpose of the conference was to provide an informal forum for discussion to better understand the security conditions and possible outcomes in Indonesia from a comprehensive view.  The primary objective was to examine Indonesia’s security conditions - past, present, future - from the following perspectives: government stability and control; military reform and reorganization; economic stability; and, religious and ethnic accommodation.  The goal was to identify measures, which would contribute to reestablishing a more secure and stable environment working toward democratization.

 

2001 Pacific Symposium:  Enhancing Regional Cooperation through New Multinational Initiatives.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 26 – 28 March 2001.  Co-host:  United States Pacific Command and National Defense University Institute for National Strategic Studies.  Two hundred fifty-four participants from 35 countries attended.  The Symposium explored areas of mutual interest, common concern, and divergence in regional perceptions of Asia-Pacific multilateral security initiatives.  During the course of the symposium, the delegates examined current regional perspectives on multilateral security cooperation in the Asia-Pacific and identified possible approaches that could lead to enhanced regional cooperation.  Possible next practical steps toward enhancing regional cooperation, while recognizing that there are different regional issues and desires were identified.

 

Security Implications of Economic and Cultural Trends.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 17 – 19 April 2001.  Thirty-one participants from Australia, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, and the United States attended.  The purpose of the conference was to contribute and enhance mutual understanding of how domestic issues drive the formation of security in ten key countries in the Asia-Pacific region.  The conference focused on six factors shaping security: economic changes; environmental degradation and resource depletion; globalization and changing ethnic/religious/national identities; demographic changes; and changes in information and education.

 

Island State Security.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 5 – 7 June 2001.  One hundred twenty-five participants from over 30 countries attended.  Key speakers were from Australia, Cook Islands, Fiji, New Zealand, England, Papua New Guinea, Federated States of Micronesia, Japan, Republic of Marshall Islands, and the United States.  The conference focused on security concerns of the Pacific islands’ to include how these concerns impact on domestic and foreign policies, how security policies and concerns of the regional powers – Australia and New Zealand – affect perceptions of threat/stability of the island states, and the significance and impact of the security concerns on U.S. policies and security interests.  Workshop sessions discussed compact negotiations, climate change, fisheries, business/economic development, and transnational crime.

 

Northeast Asia Peace and Progress.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 17 – 19 July 2001.  Fourteen participants from the United States, Japan, and China participated.  The conference continued the dialogue among the four Asia-Pacific regional powers and built upon the successes of the February 2000 Hainan Island Conference.  Key areas of discussion were the DPRK’s new diplomacy, the role of economics on the DPRK, moving toward normalization of relations between the two Koreas, and future predictions for the region. 

 

United States - Japan Alliance Management.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 28 September 2001.  Twenty-two participants from Japan and the United States participated.  The conference brought together academics, bureaucrats, military personnel, and activists in an effort to improve understanding and reach accommodation on issues relating to the U. S. military presence in Okinawa.  They discussed current and future trends in security as they relate to the need to maintain the current U.S. military structure in Okinawa; examined the social/political/economic impact of the U.S. military presence in Okinawa; and identified ways to improve relations between Tokyo, Washington, and Naha.

 

Roles of NGOs in Indonesian Security.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 2 – 4 October 2001.  Co-host:  United States Agency for International Development.  Thirty-five participants from Indonesia and the United States.  The objectives were to examine the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in Indonesia’s internal security developments, discuss current and future trends in security-related programs and activities of NGOs and identify common interests and areas of cooperation between NGOs, Indonesia’s security institutions and other government agencies, major donors and international organizations.

 

Conventional Arms Rivalry in the Asia-Pacific.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 23 – 25 October 2001.   One hundred twenty-six participants attended from over 30 countries.  The conference convened to better understand the defense modernization efforts of the region’s nations, particularly their attempts to acquire and incorporate more and better conventional weapons in their inventories.  Specifically, sessions focused on the causes and extent of regional arms competition, force modernization trends, the proliferation of land, maritime, and air force systems, the “software” dimension in defense modernization, the prospects for conventional arms control, and the implications of these trends for the prospects for conflict and for the U.S. posture in the region.  The conference included workshops on defense modernization in Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, and South Asia. 

 

Islam in Asia After September 11, 2001.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 30 October 2001.  Twenty-one on-island participants attended.  The September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the U.S. had focused attention on both U.S. relations with Asia and Islam.  This conference assessed specific security implications of Islam in Asia, including:  responses of Islamic organizations/representatives in key Asian countries to the attacks and emerging US counter-terrorism efforts; role of “Islamic considerations” in the response of key Asian governments to U.S. requests for their cooperation against terrorism; domestic stability in Asian states with large Muslim populations; nature of links between Islamic organizations across Asia; and role of Islam in the militaries of key Asian states. 

 

Chiefs of Defense Conference:  Common Defense Challenges in the Asia-Pacific Region.  Honolulu, Hawaii,           6 – 8 November 2001.  Sponsored by the United States Pacific Command with coordination support from the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.  Seventy-five participants, including 20 Chiefs of Defense from Australia, Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Canada, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, and the United States.  One and one-half days of sessions focused on current defense concerns within the respective Asia-Pacific countries, combating terrorism, improving regional readiness for multilateral operations, and peacekeeping operations.

 

Fifth Annual U.S.-Japan Security Relations.  Tokyo, Japan, 13 November 2001.  Twelve participants from Japan and the United States discussed topics on security in the Korean peninsula, an American perspective on the Asia-Pacific security environment, terrorism and U.S.-Japan cooperation, and Japanese reaction to terrorism.

 

 

2000

 

Emerging Information Paradigm in the Asia-Pacific.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 21 January 2000.  Co-host:  None.  Eighteen delegates representing three countries participated in the conference.  Attending were India, Thailand and the United States.  The purpose of the seminar was to explore how the emerging information infrastructure best supports and enhances regional security.  Specific topics focused on were information infrastructure and organization, information’s economic implications, information and military cooperation and a new information order?

 

Asia-Pacific Space and Missile Security Issues.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 15 – 17 February 2000.  Co-host:  None.  Sixty-six delegates representing nine countries participated in the conference.  Attending were Australia, China, France, India, Japan, Philippines, South Korea, Russia and the United States.  The conference identified the most critical aerospace issues to the Asia-Pacific region for the next five to ten years, anticipate how they might impact regional stability, and discuss policy options.  A variety of perspectives are sought to maximize both information and perspectives toward identifying effective and viable policy options.  Topics included space technology and applications, the proliferation of space technology, regional considerations for theater missile proliferation and defense, and theater missile defense:  critique, potential and alternatives. 

 

China’s Internal Challenges and Implications for Regional Security Seminar. Honolulu, Hawaii, 25 February 2000.  Co-host:  None.  Twenty-five participants from China, Japan, and the United States attended.  The purpose of this seminar was to contribute to greater understanding of the many internal challenges China faces.  Topics included China’s economic challenges: implications for stability; China’s future challenge:  energy and the environment; social and political consequences of China’s economic restructuring; and the PLA:  social and political implications of restructuring. 

 

Evolving Roles for the Military in the Asia-Pacific.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 28 – 30 March 2000.  One hundred seventeen participants from 31 countries participated in the conference.  The purpose of the conference was to study the trend of military involvement in “non-traditional” missions and how this evolution affects the military’s relationship with civilian governments, as well as non-military agencies.  Topics included trends in Asia and their implications for the military, evolving transnational roles:  challenges and opportunities, dynamics of the military role in civil-military relations and new directions for Asian militaries. 

 

China and the U.S.:  Long-Term Visions of Regional Security. Honolulu, Hawaii, 19 – 21 April 2000.  Co-host:  Pacific Forum CSIS.  Thirty participants from four countries attended. The purpose of the conference was to stimulate wider interest and inquiry into the Sino-U.S. relationship, its impact on other bilateral relations in the region, and the outside influences on this important relationship, and further the dialogue on long-term visions of regional security in East Asia.  Discussion topics included Sino-U.S. relationship in conjunction with Japan, the Korean Peninsula, Taiwan, economic factors, arms control, and non-proliferation issues.

 

Nuclear Weapons in Asia Seminar.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 22 April 2000.  Co-host:  none.  Seventeen participants from five countries attended.  Attendees were from China, India, Japan, Russia, and the United States.  The purpose of the seminar was to explore the future of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation regime including the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), the Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty (FMCT), and related issues.  Topics included general trends regarding nuclear non-proliferation, weapons, and specific “cases” such as South Asia, China, and the broader Asian region. 

 

Multilateral Institutions in Asia Seminar.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 14 July 2000.  There were twenty participants from five countries: Australia, Canada, Japan, Philippines and the United States.  The purpose of this seminar was to discuss and debate the future of Asia’s security institutions with a focus on ARF and CSCAP.  Session topics included assessing the reasons behind the emergence of regional security institutions, measuring the effectiveness, and examining what, if anything, should be done to strengthen their roles in the region.

 

Second Annual DPRK Economic Forum:  Engagement and Development in the DPRK. Honolulu, Hawaii,               26 – 28 July 2000.  Co-host:  United Nations Development Program and Center for International Development.  There were thirty-four participants from three countries: China, Japan, and the United States.  The purpose of this forum was to bring together organizations (United Nations, World Bank), businesses and NGOs to review and coordinate engagement and economic development activities in the DPRK.  Session topics included perspectives on the DPRK, infrastructure for business and stability, and engagement through business development.

 

Transnational Security Threats in Asia.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 8 – 10 August 2000.  One hundred fifty-two participants from 31 countries: Australia, Bangladesh, Brunei, Canada, China, India, Japan, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Micronesia, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Russia, Samoa, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, Tuvalu, United Kingdom, United States, Vanuatu, and Vietnam were in attendance.  A plenary panel of senior country representatives focused on four major sub-regions of the Asia-Pacific region.  Working groups addressed specific transnational security topics and examined how military forces from around the region have been involved in countering transnational threats.  Key topics included the growth and spread of narcotics trafficking, transnational crime, unauthorized or illegal international migration, the growth of terrorism, the proliferation of small arms in the Asia-Pacific region, maritime piracy, the spread of infectious disease, and environmental degradation.

 

India and Pakistan Nuclear Next Steps.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 6 – 8 September 2000.  Twenty participants from three countries: India, Pakistan and the United States.  The conference provided an opportunity for Indian, Pakistani and Americans to exchange views on the security situation in South Asia, examine ways in which the risks of war could be reduced, and explore possible nuclear futures in the region. 

 

Fourth Annual U.S.-Japan Security Relations.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 17 October 2000.  Eighteen participants from Japan and the United States attended.  Co-hosted with the Defense Research Center - Japan, senior level governmental and academic participants discussed issues on domestic politics in the alliance of the two countries and examined the implications and developments on the Korean Peninsula and Chinese Naval Activity in the East China Sea.

 

Chiefs of Defense Conference:  Common Defense Challenges in the Asia-Pacific Region.  Honolulu, Hawaii,         31 October – 2 November 2000.  Sponsored by the United States Pacific Command with coordination support from the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.  Sixty participants, including 18 Chiefs of Defense from Australia, Brunei, Canada, Fiji, Japan, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mongolia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga and the United States.  One and one-half days of sessions focused on current defense concerns within the respective Asia-Pacific countries, multilateral operations and exercises, humanitarian operations, and transnational concerns (counter-drug, counter-terrorism, and counter-piracy).

 

1999

 

Energy Security in the Asia-Pacific Region: Competition and Cooperation. Honolulu, Hawaii, 15 January 1999.  This seminar included 12 participants from China, India, and the United States.  The purpose of the seminar was to assess the current and future energy outlook for the region, identify the salient factors that influence energy security, and evaluate whether new aspects of the energy debate raise new security challenges. 

 

Globalization and Regional Security: Asian Perspectives.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 23 – 25 February 1999.  Forty-two participants from China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and the United States.  The conference explored the security concerns raised by globalization in Asia and highlighted areas of possible future discord in the region that may result.  Agenda topics included globalization, sovereignty, and the role of the State in Asia, globalization and Asia-Pacific security, and responding to globalization: policy considerations and possible steps. 

 

1999 Pacific Symposium:

U.S. Engagement Policy in a Changing Asia: A Time for Reassessment?  Honolulu, Hawaii, 1 – 2 March 1999.  Co-host:  National Defense University.  Two hundred forty participants from 27 countries attended.  Attending were Australia, Bangladesh, Brunei, China, Fiji, Great Britain, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Russia, Solomon Islands, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, the United States, Vanuatu, and Vietnam.  The purpose of the conference was to analyze the nations of Asia in light of current and projected conditions precipitated by the financial crisis.  Using this analysis the participants then considered the impact on future United States’ engagement policy in the region.  Country and sub-regional panels presented papers.  Keynote topics included U.S. Asian policy for the 21st Century, competition and consensus: China’s new security concept and U.S. security strategy for East Asia, and the Asian economic crisis: future security implications. 

 

Islam in Asia Seminar.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 16 April 1999.  Seventeen participants from four countries attended.  Attending were Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, and the United States.  The purpose of the seminar was to develop a fuller understanding of the current and likely future role of Islam in key countries of the Asia-Pacific region.  Topics included the role of Islamic organizations and political parities in the politics and societies of key Asian countries, the nature of links between Islamic organizations and political parties across the region, the attitudes and policies of key Islamic organizations and political parties toward regional security, and the role of Islam in the militaries of key Asian countries. 

 

Role of Nuclear Weapons in East Asia.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 18 – 20 May 1999.  Thirty-one attendees from six countries participated.  Attending were China, Japan, Russia, South Korea, Taiwan, and the United States. The purpose of this project is to determine what unilateral, bilateral and multilateral measures are most desirable and feasible for managing the nuclear weapons competition that will provide a stable security environment while reducing the risks that nuclear weapons will be used in East Asia.  This project includes two phases.  The first phase developed a joint U.S. - Japan perspective on nuclear weapons in East Asia.  This conference began the second phase to discuss management of the nuclear arms competition in East Asia.  The key findings from the conference and other consultations will be compiled in a policy paper that provides recommendations on meeting regional security needs while reducing nuclear dangers.  Specific implications for Japan and the U.S. nuclear umbrellas also will be noted. 

 

Island State Security.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 22 – 24 June 1999.  Co-host:  none.  Seventy-two participants from 13 countries attended.  Attending were Australia, Fiji, Japan, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, New Zealand, Niue Island, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Tonga, the United States, and Vanuatu.  The conference focused on Pacific Islands’ perspectives on security, regional resilience and cooperation, the relationship to the major powers, and the relationship between the Pacific islands and the United States.  Topics included Pacific island perspective of securities, regional resilience and regional cooperation, the Pacific islands and the major powers and the United States and the Pacific islands.  

 

Biennial Conference of the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies:  Asia-Pacific Security in a Time of Economic Recovery.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 30 August – 2 September 1999.  Co-host:  none.  One hundred fifty-seven participants from 38 countries participated.  Attendees were from Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Cook Islands, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Laos, Madagascar, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Russia, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, Tuvalu, the United States, Vanuatu, and Vietnam.  Others were Egypt from the Middle East and France, Germany and Switzerland from Europe.  The focal point of the conference was on regional security issues.  Plenary sessions covered country perspectives on regional security.  In addition, six workshops were offered including “Arms Proliferation in the Asia-Pacific Region,” “Governance in an Era of Diminished Expectations,” “Asian Capitalism into the Early 21st Century,” “Military Roles in Transnational Security,” “The Future of the Asia-Pacific Community” and “Urbanization and Security.” 

 

Water and Conflict in Asia Seminar.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 17 September 1999.  Co-host:  None.  There were fifteen participants from three countries.  Attending were India, Japan and the United States.  The seminar studied the growing challenge of water shortages in the region.  Specific topics focused on current trends in water security (globally, and within the Asia-Pacific region), factors that Influence water quantity and quality, water security and international relations and policy solutions to water security challenges. 

 

Chiefs of Defense Conference:  Changing Roles of the Militaries and Defense Sectors in Asia.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 15 – 17 November 1999.  Sponsored by the United States Pacific Command with coordination support from the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.  Fifty participants, including 16 Chiefs of Defense from Australia, Brunei, Canada, Fiji, India, Japan, South Korea, Mauritius, Mongolia, Nepal, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Tonga and the United States.  Two days of sessions focused on economic and political trends, and evolving multilateral military roles.

 

 

1998

 

Asia-Pacific Economics and Security Conference.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 12 – 13 January 1998.  Co-host:  United States Pacific Command.  Seventy-five participants from the United States explored the recent financial turmoil in Asia and the resulting political, economic and security implications.  The conference culminated in an executive review with the United States Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific. 

 

International Game ’98:  Korean Reconciliation and Asian Security.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 27 – 30 April 1998.  Co-host:  U.S. Navy War College.  Forty participants from Australia, China, France, Germany, Japan, Russia, South Korea, Singapore, United Kingdom, United Nations, and the United States attended.  Over two major moves, this politico-military simulation explored the roles of the international community and individual countries in conflict resolution and facilitating change in the relationship between the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and the Republic of Korea. 

 

U.S.-PRC Security Cooperation in Northeast Asia.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 26 – 28 May 1998.  Co-host United States Institute of Peace.  Forty participants from China and the United States attended.  This meeting featured discussions on the future of security in Northeast Asia.  Topics included current economic and political situation in East Asia, prospects for Northeast Asian security dialogue, possibilities for tension reduction on the Korean Peninsula, and international context and the future of regional security:  Influence of Korean situation on Northeast Asian cooperative security prospects. 

 

Global Security Trends and U.S.-China Defense Relations.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 30 June – 2 July 1998.  Sponsored by Preventive Defense Project, a research collaboration of Stanford and Harvard Universities.  Thirty participants from China and the United States attended.  Heads of the delegations included Mr. Wang Dao-Han, Senior Consultant to China Foundation for International and Strategic Studies and Dr. William Perry, former U.S. Secretary of Defense.  The purpose of the conference was to have a candid, unofficial dialogue and exchange of ideas with senior security experts on how to deepen and enhance the Sino - U.S. relationship in the security sphere.  Topics included strategic and military trends, South Asian security, the Taiwan issue in US - China relations, and perspectives on security in the East Asia pacific region.

 

Asian Perspectives on the Economic Crisis, Honolulu, Hawaii, 18 – 20 August 1998.  Forty attendees from China, Indonesia, South Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and the United States participated.  This symposium presented Asian views on the economic, political, and social consequences of the financial crisis from a national and regional perspective.  Topics for discussion included: Is the crisis a watershed in East Asia’s political development?, socioeconomic costs of the crisis in Southeast Asia, what is Japan’s perspective on its role in the financial crisis?, and what has been the impact of the crisis on China? 

 

Asian Approaches to International Negotiations:  Borders and Territories.  Honolulu, Hawaii,                                     8 – 10 September 1998.  Co-host:  Atlantic Council of the United States.  Fifty participants from Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Mongolia, Pakistan, Philippines, Russia, Thailand, the United States, and Vietnam attended.  The purpose of this conference was to discern common patterns in how the Chinese have dealt with border disputes and territorial claims over the last four decades, and whether these patterns continue.  It also examined how China is addressing current and future issues such as Taiwan’s status in the future.  The conference consisted of a series of six panels, during which country representatives presented their views and experiences in negotiations with China.  The long term objective is increasing the general knowledge and understanding, both within the region and beyond, of the way in which the countries of the region seek to use negotiations rather than force to achieve national goals.

 

Food Security and Political Stability in the Asia-Pacific Region.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 11 September 1998.  Seventeen participants from the Philippines and the United States attended.  This seminar explored the current and future food security situation in the Asia-Pacific region and assessed the long-term strategic implications.  Four discussion sessions focused on defining the issues, exploring case studies, and identifying future challenges and security implications. 

 

Chiefs of Defense Conference:  Asia-Pacific Security Challenges for the 21st Century.  Honolulu, Hawaii,                29 September – 1 October 1998.  Sponsored by the United States Pacific Command with coordination support from the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.  Seventy-nine participants, including 13 Chiefs of Defense, from Australia, Brunei, Fuji, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Maldives, Mongolia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Tonga, and the United States.  Two days of sessions focused on the impact of economic and political challenge on Asia-Pacific security and stability and examined regional issues affecting Asia-Pacific security and the future requirements for interoperability in the region.

 

Third Annual U.S-Japan Security Relations Conference.  Tokyo, Japan, 28 October 1998.  There were eighteen participants from Japan and the United States.  In this third conference co-hosted with the Defense Research Center, security experts assessed the health of the U.S.-Japan alliance itself, and explored how the two countries can work together in addressing security concerns.  Topics included Alliance politics: Okinawa and the defense guidelines, the Asian financial crisis: implications for U.S. - Japan relations, and the U.S. - Japan Alliance and regional security concerns.

 

ASEAN Regional Forum Inter-Sessional Support Group On Confidence Building Measures.  Honolulu, Hawaii.        4 – 6 November 1998.  Co-chaired by the United States and Thailand, with coordination support from the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.  One hundred participants from 20 countries plus the European Union attended.  Attending were Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Canada, China, European Union, India, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Thailand, United States, and Vietnam.  Topics included exchange of views on defense policies, consideration of CBM’s, and Maritime cooperation.   

 

 

1997

 

Conference on Transitions of Power: Democratic Enlargement in Asia.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 27 – 29 January 1997.  Co-host:  The Asia Foundation.  Forty participants from Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Taiwan, and the United States attended.  Topics included:  Transitions in the military role, structuring transparency in the political process, Mongolia's election and transitional experience, governance and party politics, economic reform and its impact on political liberalization, and implications for regional stability. 

 

1997 Pacific Symposium.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 28 – 29 April 1997.  Co-host:  National Defense University Institute for National Strategic Studies.  Two hundred sixty participants from Australia, Canada, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Philippines, Russia, Thailand, United Kingdom and the United States participated.  The Symposium concentrated on the utility and missions of military forces of the Asia-Pacific nations.  The objective was to develop a military balance assessment of where Asia-Pacific military forces are today as well as where they are going tomorrow; to assess present and future force structure, with the resultant understanding of how the militaries of the region will interact with each other and the United States; and to describe some concepts for how to effect constructive engagement among Asia‑Pacific defense ministries and forces. 

 

Environmental Change and Regional Security Conference.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 9 – 11 June 1997.  Co-host:  The Center for Strategic Leadership, US Army War College.  Sixty participants from Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, South Korea, Mongolia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, the United States, and Western Samoa participated.  The purpose of the conference was to provide a forum in which national officials, academics, and military officers could explore the security implications of environmental change within the region.  Plenary sessions focused on topics such as a framework for thinking about environmental change in Asia, environmental challenges to regional stability and conflict, environment as a catalyst for Asia-Pacific cooperation, and defense cooperation in environmental protection issues. 

 

Annual Conference of the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies:  Asia-Pacific Security For the 21st Century: Honolulu, Hawaii, 3 – 6 November 1997.  Co-host: none.  One hundred sixty-five participants from 35 countries attended.  Participants from Australia, Bangladesh, Brunei, Canada, China, Cook Islands, England, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mongolia, Nauru, New Zealand, Niue Island, Pakistan, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, Tuvalu, the United States, Vanuatu, and Vietnam.  Plenary panels focused on dynamics of the Asia-Pacific from a sub-regional perspective.  Four working groups addressed new dimensions in the region with topics such as political transition, social change, and regional security; economic development and regional security; military modernization, technological change and security; and transnational security issues. 

 

Second Annual Conference on U. S. - Japan Security Relations.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 19 November 1997.  Co-host: Japan Defense Research Center.  Twenty-five senior level governmental and academic participants from Japan and the US discussed topics related to the security environment of the Asia-Pacific Region and the US-Japan security relationship.  Topics included:  potential threats and flashpoints and the guidelines review and implications for the future. 

 

 

1996

 

ASEAN Regional Forum Inter-Sessional Meeting on Search and Rescue Cooperation and Coordination in the Asia Pacific Region (ARF SAR ISM).  Honolulu, Hawaii, 4 – 7 March 1996.  Co-hosts:  Singapore Ministry of Foreign Affairs,

US State Department Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs, and USPACOM.  Eighty participants from Australia, Cambodia, Canada, China, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Thailand, the United States, and Vietnam attended.  Also included were representatives of the European Union, IMO, and ICAO.  Topics included international SAR conventions/publications, regional SAR training overview, civilian and military SAR coordination and cooperation, SAR communications and the potential for regional coordination and cooperation, and benefits of regional SAR coordination and cooperation. 

 

Asia-Pacific Senior Seminar.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 8 – 14 April 1996.  Co-hosts:  The East-West Center and Pacific Forum CSIS.  This was their 3rd annual seminar.  Thirty governmental and academic participants from Australia, Cambodia, Canada, China, France, India, Indonesia, Japan, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, New Zealand, Philippines, Pakistan, Singapore, South Korea, the United States, Vietnam, ASEAN, and the United Nations discussed topics focused on the outlook of security and economics dynamics, sub-regional issues and perspectives, and region-wide issues and processes. 

 

US-Japan Security Relations Conference.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 8 May 1996.  Co-host: Defense Research Center-Japan.  Seventeen senior level governmental and academic participants discussed topics such as the security environment in the region, the defense policy of the United States and Japan, US-Japan security cooperation, and confidence building measures in the region. 

 

 

1995

 

Peacekeeping Lessons Learned Conference.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 28 – 30 June 1995.  Co-host: USPACOM.  Forty-five participants and 55 observers from Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, China, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Tonga and the United States participated.  Plenary sessions focused on the many facets of peacekeeping operations, outlined United States and United Nations peacekeeping policy, and described how one can apply measures of effectiveness.  In addition, every country delegation presented papers on the lessons they learned during their participation in peacekeeping operations. 

 

Asia‑Pacific Center for Security Studies Conference on Asia‑Pacific Security for the 21st Century:  Managing Change and Stability.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 3 – 6 September 1995.  Co-host: none.  Thirty-two countries represented by 110 participants attended.  Participants were from Australia, Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Canada, China, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, France, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Laos, South Korea, Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mongolia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, Tuvalu, United Kingdom, Western Samoa and the United States.  The conference included four plenary sessions: Perspectives on the way ahead in the Asia‑Pacific region by Secretary of Defense William J. Perry, the challenges of political and social change to regional stability and cooperation, the challenges of economic change to regional stability and cooperation, and the challenges of military/technological change to regional stability and cooperation.  Also included were four workshop sessions on political/social change, economic change, military/technological change, and managing change.  

 

Humanitarian Support Operations Conference.  Honolulu, Hawaii, 17 – 23 September 1995.  Co-hosts: The Center Of Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance, American Red Cross, US Army Medical Command, and USPACOM.  One hundred fifty representatives from the Pacific Basin and Rim Countries, US Embassy Country Teams, Non-governmental Organizations (e.g., SUMA, World Vision, Save the Children), Red Cross and Red Crescent National Societies, United Nations, and Department of Defense attended.  Countries represented were Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Pakistan, Philippines, Switzerland, Thailand, Tonga, and the United States.  Main agenda included:  the Geneva Conventions and international humanitarian law in complex emergencies, security skill development for the humanitarian professional, regional organizations in peace operations, and coordinating United Nations humanitarian assistance in the field.